New Chief Scientific Officer

Soil Health Institute Names Dr. Cristine Morgan as Chief Scientific Officer-

Dr. Cristine Morgan has been named Chief Scientific Officer​ of the Soil Health Institute.
RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., December 18, 2018 — The Soil Health Institute (SHI) announced today that one of the nation’s premier Soil Scientists, Dr. Cristine Morgan, will serve as its Chief Scientific Officer. Dr. Morgan will replace Dr. Steven Shafer who recently retired after serving in the position since 2016.

“Dr. Morgan brings a unique combination of technical, educational, and leadership experience to the position,” said Dr. Wayne Honeycutt, SHI President and CEO.  “Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Morgan has conducted ground-breaking research on how management practices influence soil-plant-water relations. She has also developed methods that were adopted by USDA for easily measuring soil carbon. She has a history of applying her knowledge for addressing real-world problems experienced by farmers and ranchers and is passionate about educating others along the way.”

Dr. Morgan comes to the Soil Health Institute after serving as a Professor of Soil Science at Texas A&M University, where she received numerous awards for teaching and research.  She serves on the Board of Directors for the Soil Science Society of America, Editor-in-Chief for the global soil science journal, Geoderma, and leads the U.S. effort for the Global Soil Security partnership. Dr. Morgan received her B.S. degree in Plant and Environmental Soil Sciences from Texas A&M University, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Soil Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“Dr. Morgan’s research programs are characterized by organizing interdisciplinary research teams to solve problems with creative and practical solutions. Her academic program was recognized for outstanding teaching, research, and mentoring by local, national, and international organizations. Her students have been awarded numerous national and international awards and scholarships for their work advancing knowledge in soil physics and pedology. She is clearly the right professional to build on our momentum,” said Bill Buckner, SHI Board Chair.

“Soil health is a global existential challenge that is closely linked to food, water, energy security, biodiversity, and human health,” said Dr. Morgan. “I look forward to the opportunity to work with the Soil Health Institute team and its many stakeholders, recognizing the value of soil to benefit the sustainability and vitality of farms, agriculture, and society.”

For further information, visit www.soilhealthinstitute.org.

About the Soil Health Institute

The Soil Health Institute’s (www.soilhealthinstitute.org) is a non-profit whose mission is to safeguard and enhance the vitality and productivity of soil through scientific research and advancement. The Institute works with its many stakeholders to identify gaps in research and adoption; develop strategies, networks and funding to address those gaps; and ensure beneficial impact of those investments to agriculture, the environment and society.

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Achieving Sustainability Goals Through Soil Health

Webinar: How Soil Health Helps Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions
and Accomplish Sustainability Goals-


On November 29th, the Soil Health Institute and The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) hosted a webinar on how managing for soil health can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and achieve other sustainability goals, how those outcomes can be quantified, and how that information can be used to address TSC’s Key Performance Indicators. This webinar featured Keith Berns (Farmer, NE), Wayne Honeycutt (President & CEO, Soil Health Institute), and Kevin O’Donnell (Sustainability Director of Worldwide Sourcing, General Mills).

A recording of the webinar is available to download here. The slide deck can be found here.

Living Soil Film Documents Soil Health Movement

Lesson Plans Extend Soil Health Message to High Schools, Colleges-

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC, Dec. 5, 2018 – The Soil Health Institute (SHI) has released high school and college lesson plans designed to be used with Living Soil, a 60-minute documentary that captures the history – and significance – of the soil health movement.

The documentary features diverse scenes of food production from the Dust Bowl to today. Urban and rural farmers from different areas of the United States talk about strategies they use to improve soil health and the impact on food stability, environmental sustainability, and human nutrition. The film also includes soil health researchers and other soil health experts commenting about new trends and developments with soil health.

The primary learning goal is to help high school and college students develop an understanding of why soil health is important and identify ways that professionals in production agriculture work to improve the health of our nation’s soils, ultimately benefiting all members of society. The lesson plans are appropriate for classes in agriculture, natural resources, environment, ecology, biology or human nutrition and food systems.

The film package is available to stream/download at www.livingsoilfilm.com.

 


Living Soil was directed by Chelsea Myers and Tiny Attic Productions based in Columbia, Missouri, and produced by the Soil Health Institute through the generous support of The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation.

A special thanks to Dawn Bentley, Brian Berns, Keith Berns, Bill Buckner, Mimo Davis, Dan DeSutter, Miranda Duschak, James “Ooker” Eskridge, Barry Fisher, Liz Graznak, Steve Groff, Jerry Hatfield, Trey Hill, Larkin Martin, Bianca Moebius-Clune, Jesse Sanchez, Larry Thompson, John Wiebold, Kristen Veum, Kevin Mathein, Ben Harris, Tim Pilcher, Josh Wright, Haley Myers, Rob Myers and Josh Oxenhandler.